Rightfully Hers

Now Celebrating

Montana

Montana

August 2, 1919
In 1914, Montana voted in favor of equal suffrage. The suffrage victory was the result of prolonged efforts from hundreds across the state including a neighbor-to-neighbor campaign organized by the Christian Temperance Union that gave momentum to the movement.
Learn More
Nebraska

Nebraska

August 2, 1919
After women were given the municipal vote in 1917, an anti-suffrage group petitioned seeking an annulment of the statute. Over the course of a long court battle, Nebraska suffragists gained support leading to Nebraska becoming the fourteenth state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution. Within the year, the Nebraska Woman Suffrage Association reorganized as the Nebraska League of Women Voters.
Learn More

Past Anniversaries

Arkansas

Arkansas

July 28, 1919
The Arkansas Woman Suffrage Association organized in 1881 and the Political Equality League organized by 1911. In May 1918, after legislators endured lobbying from these organizations, women were first allowed to vote in Arkansas, but only in primaries. Later, the Arkansas State Legislature vote passed 74-15 and made Arkansas the twelfth state to ratify the 19th Amendment.
Learn More
Texas

Missouri

July 3, 1919
On July 2, 1919, Missouri Governor Frederick D. Gardner called for a special session to consider extending the right of suffrage to women, in hopes Missouri could help lead the way toward ratification. The following day, the Missouri Senate followed the lead of the House of Representatives and voted to ratify the amendment, making Missouri the 11th state to vote for ratification.
Learn More
Texas

Iowa

July 2, 1919
Women in Iowa were granted “partial suffrage" in 1894 and nearly received full suffrage in 1916 but a constitutional amendment was narrowly defeated. However, the movement had gained legs and in 1919, after Iowa-raised Carrie Chapman Catt helped lead the charge, Iowa became the 10th state to ratify the 19th Amendment.
Learn More
Texas

Texas

June 28, 1919
Texas became the ninth state in the Union, and the first state in the South, to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment. The state’s support of women’s enfranchisement set the stage for other southern states to ratify the 19th Amendment.
Learn More
Massachusetts

Massachusetts

June 25, 1919
Massachusetts was the eighth state to ratify the 19th Amendment and home to many notable women the cause. In 1870, activists Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, Julia Ward Howe, and other supporters of the movement formed the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association. These groups worked together, sharing goals and partaking in the same educational, promotional, and legislative lobbying activities that helped push the topic of women’s voting rights forward.
Learn More
Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

June 24, 1919
When the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, Pennsylvania was the largest state in which women had not previously had the right to vote. Several Pennsylvanians had been critical figures in the long struggle to secure women’s suffrage. Women like Dora Lewis and Caroline Katzenstein were active in the Pennsylvania and national branches of both the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and the National Woman’s Party (NWP).
Learn More
Kansas

Kansas

June 16, 1919
When Kansas Territory was organized in 1854, women's issues, and suffrage in particular, were immediately at the forefront. Kansas women gained the right to vote in school district elections in 1861 and municipal elections in 1887. Then, in the early 20th Century, the campaign for woman's suffrage took on new life. On November 5, 1912, Kansas voters approved the Equal Suffrage Amendment to the state constitution. After winning suffrage on the state level, activities took the fight to the national stage, ratifying the 19th Amendment on June 16, 1919.
Learn More
Ohio

Ohio

June 16, 1919
Ohio women were actively involved in the struggle for suffrage, and even formed the Ohio Woman's Suffrage Association, in the late 1800s. While they gained voting rights in school board elections in the 1890s, the struggle for full equal voting rights continued. After the 19th Amendment passed, Ohio women quickly and successfully ran for office, including Amy Kaukonen, who was the first woman elected mayor of a community in Ohio and one of the first women elected mayor in the entire United States.
Learn More
New York

New York

June 16, 1919
Seneca Falls, NY is long believed to be the birth of the women’s rights movement and many of the movement’s earliest pioneers, including Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, advocated heavily within the state. The state’s passing of women's suffrage in 1917 sparked the momentum for the entire nation to follow suit just a few short years later.
Learn More
Wisconsin

Wisconsin

June 10, 1919
Wisconsin became the first state to ratify the 19th amendment, which was surprising; only seven years before, the state defeated an important suffrage referendum. The ratification was the result of the efforts of many different women's rights groups that had been working since 1846. In a nail biting race to ratify between Wisconsin and Illinois, the Wisconsin legislature completed its vote and got it to Washington in the nick of time - going down in history as the first state to ratify the 19th Amendment! 
Learn More
Michigan

Michigan

June 10, 1919
When the United States entered World War I, subsequent work by women in support of the war effort garnered further male endorsement for woman suffrage. Finally, a woman state suffrage law appeared on the November 1918 ballot – and was passed by Michigan’s voters.
Learn More
Illinois

Illinois

June 10, 1919
Women's suffrage movements began in Illinois as early as the 1860s, although attempts to grant women the right to vote as part of the 1870 Illinois constitution failed. Then, on June 10, 1919 the Illinois legislature voted to ratify the 19th Amendment in a neck and neck race with Wisconsin. Were it not for a mandatory re-vote due to incorrect wording in the Illinois resolution, Illinois would have been the first state to ratify. Turns out, the devil really is in the details! But in the hearts and minds of many Illinoisans, Illinois remains the true winner in the race to ratify. 
Learn More
Wyoming

Wyoming

1869
In 1869, Wyoming became the first state or territory in the nation to grant suffrage to women on equal footing with men, as well as the rights to hold public office, own and inherit property, and the guardianship of minor children.
Learn More